Posts Tagged With: Seasick

Day 15: Monday 28 Nov – Wellington to Picton

Today we only had to ride 4km to the ferry and then 1.5 km in Picton to the camp.

Even though the ferry was not sailing until 9am we had to have our bags out by 630 am as the trucks needed to get down to the ferry to queue. There were no breakfast facilities at the motel so we were told we were going to get a breakfast pack. Turned out it was a breakfast and a lunch park. It was huge, a plastic supermarket bag full of food. A smoothie, a fruit drink, an orange, a banana, a fruit log, 3 small packets of savory snack biscuits, 2 cheese segments, 2 rolls with frankfurters, a Muesli bar, and a round plastic container 250gm of nuts. How many days was this for again?

I had been a bit nervous about the sailing as I suffer really badly from motion sickness and the past few days the seas had been really rough.Thankfully today it was really quite calm. I had a nice ride along the water front and crossed over at the Westpac stadium and down to the ferry. I could not believe how many people there were as foot passengers – the terminal was packed. Usually when I catch the ferry I am driving a vehicle.

We had to walk our bikes as a group onto the vehicle deck.

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The ferry we travelled on to Picton

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Onto the boat

We were sailing on the newest Interislander ferry, which had some really good seating facilities. I got a good seat at the back of the boat, with a nice view out over the water. The sailing was three hours and really calm all the way across. Once we got into the Marlborough Sounds I even managed to get a blog update done.

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Sailing to the South Island (Photo and Caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Once we got to Picton we had to go to the vehicle deck and wait to be let off. It was a bit unpleasant with all the cars with their engines running, but luckily they let us off  quickly.

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Waiting to get off the ferry

A short 1.5km ride and we were at camp by 12:30 pm. We arrived before the trucks, so had to wait for them to arrive so we could get our bags.

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Sunny and warm in Picton (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Once we had set up our tents Brett, Michele, Tony and I walked into the town and had a look around. We stopped at a bar with a nice outside area and had steamed green mussels in wine and garlic, wedges, and a ParrotDog Pilsner, then we moved to the next bar. Tony, Brett had I had a Kereru Pilsner, and Michele had a cider.

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Lazy afternoon in Picton

After this we walked around Picton looking at the shops. I tried a couple of hairdressers as I badly need a hair cut. Although they said “no appointment necessary” they were both fully booked. I will have to wait until after the ride.

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Another ferry in the Picton Harbour (Photo credit: Michele’s Facebook)

We called into one more bar on the way back to camp and saw “Pisco sours” on the cocktail menu, so we decided that as we had all done the section of the South American ride where they were from, we would have one. Well, although they are on menu clearly they are not popular as the bartender had to ask another bartender and they had to refer to notes, and they took over 45 minutes to make. They were not worth the wait but the thought was good. As I said to Michele – we will remember them more because of the disproportionate amount of time they took to make, and how uninspiring the end result was.

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Disappointing Pisco Sours

Dinner was fresh cooked (lemon) fish with couscous and a broccoli salad. Tony and Michele shared a bottle of Vidals (Hawkes Bay) Pinot with us.

We have a new rider called Justina from Switzerland, she has come all the way just to do the two week South Island ride. Every rider’s nightmare: she arrived but no bike or bag! Hopefully it will be sent on tonight’s ferry.

Tomorrow is the birthday for both Emily (the tour leader) and Mika (a TDA worker). A couple of the riders had organised cakes, candles, and cards, which we all contributed to and signed. After dinner we sang happy birthday and had cake and candles.

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Categories: Trans-Oceania | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Day 65/164: Rest day in Nazca

I have organized to go flying over the Nazca lines today. I am starting to regret this, thinking of small planes and motion sickness. However the only way to see them is in the air.

These lines were built over hundreds of years and anthropologists are still trying to work out the reasoning behind them. There are lines that are pictures of hummingbirds, whales, families, and an astronaut (or as one line of thought goes – an alien). There are other lines that are geometrical shapes and then lines straight and diagonal that line them up. This is really impressive having been done from the ground over hundreds of miles.

The lines were plotted by the line creators, who put stakes in the ground and then joined them with string. Then other workers came and cleared the stones and a layer of dirt. The stones were placed at the outside of the lines which helped protect them from the wind. The language of these people has gone but the lines remain.

Also as they were dependent on water, they suffered drought and practiced human sacrifice. This is not yet fully understood whether it was people from other tribes or from within their own. Also they discovered they could get water deep below the surface of the desert and created huge wells with steps in a circle going down. They also built quite sophisticated irrigation systems for their crops.

With flying in mind, I had a plain breakfast of rolls and tea. (Editor’s note: Love the seamless change of topic here 🙂

A group of us were picked up at the hotel at 8:30am  to go to the airport, once again in a beat up old car.

When we arrived at the airport we had to pay departure tax of $20 sole, and watch a video about the history of the lines. Then set off for the 55 minute flight!

I had my camera with me but only managed to take about three photos, as every time I looked down and tried to focus the camera the motion sickness started to creep in.

It did not help that the plane was a six seater and the pilot was showing passengers on both sides of the plane each of the lines, so lot of banking and rolling.

The lines were amazing and I am really pleased I saw them. It was also great to see the vastness of the desert, and see the road we had rode in on. I managed to keep the motion sickness at bay whilst on the plane, but had the bag on my knee just in case!

Nazca Lines

Nazca Lines

Nazca lines

Nazca lines

The Hummingbird

The Hummingbird

Nazca lines

Nazca lines

The very small plane

The very small plane

I got back onto the ground and was waiting to be picked up, when I was still feeling very queasy and then lost my breakfast into a garden. Probably just as well, as would not have been good if it had been in the driver’s car.

I had taken my broken glasses with me as figured it would be easier to ask where to go for new ones. I showed the driver, he nodded and smiled and took me to a shop in town, which turned out to be an optician. Luckily I managed to convey that I just needed them for reading, and got two pairs for $20 sole each. The spare pair is now in a case. I will still need to get more so am keeping a look out for a street vendor.

After this I was hungry having lost breakfast. I had a sandwich, then off to the supermarket for supplies and back to the hotel. I ended up having to get Ponds moisturizer as it was the only one that I was sure was actually moisturizer.

I spent the afternoon sending photos, which was really frustrating as the Internet was really slow, and going through my gear. I am having lots of problems trying to shut my day bag, so was trying to take stuff out plus put more warm clothes in. Net result was I got the warm clothes in and some stuff out, and it is still just as hard to shut.

I decided to have dinner at the hotel rather than go into town again. Out of curiosity I chose pork steak, which ended up being like schnitzel but not crumbed, rice, an egg, and my favourite: plantain – oh well, I had a good meal last night.

Then an early night as we have a big day tomorrow – 90 kilometres, all uphill climbing from 400 meters to 3,200 meters!

A whole pile of lines and trapezoids (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg's blog)

A whole pile of lines and trapezoids (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg’s blog)

The Astronaut (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg's blog)

The Astronaut (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg’s blog)

This is a general shot of the valley.  Lots of agriculture and a dry river.  A lot of the lines have been affected by water flows, whenever it happens  (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg's blog)

This is a general shot of the valley. Lots of agriculture and a dry river. A lot of the lines have been affected by water flows, whenever it happens (Photo and caption credit: Laura and Greg’s blog)

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Categories: Peru, South American Epic | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Day 60/164: Lima to Pucusana – 58km

Climbing 480 meters, down 555 meters.

Tonight we are staying at Hospedaje Puerto Escondido, it is a hostel as TDA could not find any other accommodation. We are of course all devastated by not having to set up our tents.

More good news, as we are the on the South side of Lima we don’t have to ride in a convoy out of the city.

We had breakfast at the hotel. Only problem is there are 10 floors but only one lift! The lift can fit 4 people and there are about 45 of us including staff. Nothing for it but to walk up. Well, if I had not already realized how fit I was getting I would now: 10 floors of stairs, no problem – I was barely even breathing harder than normal 🙂

We left the hotel in groups. Riding in Peru is difficult at the best of times, let alone in rush hour traffic. Thankfully we are riding away from Lima as the traffic is hideous! Riding in the group are two of the new riders, Tony and Michelle from Tasmania. They are doing the section from Lima to Cusco, then doing part of the Macha Picchu trail. They have a good sense of humour and I think we are going to get along well.

With today only being 58 kilometres and 480 meters of climbing, it feels like a rest day. Needless to say lunch will be where we are staying.

After we got off the Pan American highway it was a lot less stressful. Only one hill of any significance and that was less than 2 kilometres.  We rolled into Pucusana at about 9:30am, way too early for lunch so we went for a look around the town.

Checking out the harbour (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Checking out the harbour (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

It is a really pretty little port town, small dinghies, fishing boats, and one fishing ship. On the water front are lots of hopeful pelicans and other sea birds (oyster catchers, herons, pacific gulls) plus dogs of every type and description and breed.

Harbour at Pucusana

Harbour at Pucusana

Pelicans at the port in Pucusana

Pelicans at the port in Pucusana

Pucusana Harbour (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Pucusana Harbour (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Picturesque harbour in Pucusana (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Picturesque harbour in Pucusana (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Pucusana (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Pucusana (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Pelican on a tin roof (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Pelican on a tin roof (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

A couple of cute dogs (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

A couple of cute dogs (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

We wandered around for a while, and then went back to the hostel to have lunch and get changed etc. It was still only 10:30 so not that hungry.

We were greeted by the news that one of the riders – Fred from USA – had fallen off his bike that morning. Fred had got his water bottle out to squirt a dog and hit a bump and lost his balance and hit his head, his helmet broke in 3 places and he hurt his arm. He was now off to the hospital having X-rays etc. Fingers crossed he is not too badly injured.

After a shower and catching up some of us headed back to down to the port and looked around some more. We stopped at a restaurant, had a cold beer and a fish sandwich. I was toying with the idea of going out on one of the boat trips around the harbour. It was $40 soles for 40 minutes. I get sea sickness, but I really wanted to see the sea lions. I decided to risk it.

I did feel a bit nauseous but it was worth it. I saw a really large colony of sea lions, then a rock with 3 young bulls, then another small colony. There were heaps of birds, a few sea lions in the water, and some huge brightly coloured crabs.

A boat load of other cyclists (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

A boat load of other cyclists (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Seals on the rocks (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Seals on the rocks (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog) (Editors note: I am told these are in fact sea lions)

Seals on the rocks (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Seals on the rocks (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog) (Editors note: I am told these are in fact sea lions)

A king pelican, the biggest of them all (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

A king pelican, the biggest of them all (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Can you spot the island with the white house on it (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Can you spot the island with the white house on it (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

At the entrance to the harbour was a house that looked like a boat, amazing location and for sale.

The "house boat"

The “house boat”

I was feeling a bit green after the boat ride so went back to the hostel. There was a huge dog fight, but thankfully none of the dogs seemed to be hurt.

At the riders meeting the update on Fred was that sadly he has a chip out of his elbow and needs surgery, so he maybe out of the rest of the trip. It depends on his insurance company whether he has the surgery in Lima or back in the States. We are all a bit sad to see both Bob and Fred leaving us unexpectedly. Hopefully Fred may be able to join us towards the end of the trip, depending on how his recovery goes.

Dinner was spaghetti bolognese, pasta, and salad.

In the market (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

In the market (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Local scene (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Local scene (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

Love this boat (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

Love this boat (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

View over the habour from the hill top (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

View over the habour from the hill top (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

View from our hostel roof (Photo and caption credit: Sue's blog)

View from our hostel roof (Photo and caption credit: Sue’s blog)

 

Categories: Peru, South American Epic | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments